A hunter’s guide to nutrition part one — Deer, wild boar, and other large mammals

Hunting is a sport, it’s a great way to get outdoors, it can be a bonding experience for a parent and child, but it’s also a way to put meat on the table. This historically has arguably been the most important result from the hunt. It provided humans the very sustenance and the nutrition they needed to survive.

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Elk

Elks are one of the largest species in the deer family. Altogether, they’re simply one of the largest mammals in North America. Period. Easily spotted by their large antlers, they have lean meat that’s higher in protein than chicken or even beef.

Serving Size — 3.5 oz.
Calories — 137
Protein — 22.8 g
Fat — 0.9 g
Cholesterol — 67 mg
Vitamins (percentage by daily recommended dosage)
17% Iron

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Caribou

Male and female caribou can both grow antlers. You probably already know that. They move north in the summer and south for the winter. You also probably know that, but did you know that they’re a great source of B-12?

Serving Size — 3 oz.
Calories — 142
Protein — 25 g
Fat — 4 g
Cholesterol — 93 mg
Vitamins (percentage by daily recommended dosage)
29% Iron, 45% Riboflavin, 14% Thiamin, 94% B-12

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Wild Boar

You haven’t lived until you’ve tasted wild boar bacon. They can quickly over populate areas in the American South and they’re always a challenging hunt. They’re also loaded with nutrition.

Serving Size — 3 oz.
Calories — 136
Protein — 24 g
Fat — 4 g
Cholesterol — 65 mg
Vitamins (percentage by daily recommended dosage)
5% Iron, 7% Riboflavin, 18% Niacin, 18% Thiamin, 18% B-6, 10% B-12

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Whitetail Deer

It’s the number one freezer filler for most hunters in the United States. The population numbers are good and the season is longer than some of the other game. So what’s in all that high-quality venison?

Serving Size — 3 oz.
Calories — 134
Protein — 26 g
Fat — 3 g
Cholesterol — 95 mg
Vitamins (percentage by daily recommended dosage)
21% Iron, 30% Riboflavin, 29% Niacin

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Mule Deer

It’s oftentimes larger and a bit leaner than the average whitetail. The name comes from their distinct ears which look more like a mule’s than a deer’s.

Serving Size — 3.5 oz.
Calories — 145
Protein — 24 g
Fat — 1.3 g
Cholesterol — 107 mg
Vitamins (percentage by daily recommended dosage)
24% Iron, 31% Riboflavin, 32% Niacin

Related Stories: Whitetail Deer Hunting Tips for Opening Day

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Pronghorn Antelope

The pronghorn antelope may very well be the fastest mammal in North America. It’s only slightly slower than the cheetah and is fully capable of reaching speeds at nearly 60 mph. They’re 100-150 pounds when grown; that’s a lot of protein, Folks!

Serving Size — 3 oz
Calories — 128
Protein — 25 g
Fat — 2 g
Cholesterol — 107 mg
Vitamins (percentage by daily recommended dosage)
20% Iron, 36% Riboflavin, 15% Thiamin

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Mountain Goat

Mountain goats can be found all over the Rocky Mountains, Cascade Mountain Range, Alaska, and more. The males can get up to 180 pounds! That’s a lot of meat. So if you can brave the low temperatures that these goats love, you can get quite a haul.

Serving Size — 3 oz.
Calories — 122
Protein — 23 g
Fat — 3 g
Cholesterol — 64 mg
Vitamins (percentage by daily recommended dosage)
18% Iron, 30% Riboflavin, 5% Thiamin

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Bighorn Sheep

The horns alone can weigh in at 30 pounds, so it should come as no surprise that these guys can weigh up to 300 pounds. Their habitat is spread across the Southern bit of Canada all the way down to Mexico. It’s fattier than goat but still leaner than most cuts of beef.

Serving Size — 3 oz.
Calories — 198
Protein — 27 g
Fat — 9 g
Cholesterol — 93 mg
Vitamins (percentage by daily recommended dosage)
21% Iron, 63% B-12, 15% Riboflavin, 27% Niacin

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(Images source; Wikimedia Commons)

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